News

Big Change to Refrigerant Cylinders Coming in January 2020

Beginning January 2020 per Air-Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Institute’s (AHRI) Guideline N, Assignment of Refrigerant Container Colors, all refrigerant cylinders should be painted a gray-green color, specifically RAL 7044. This is a change from previous guidelines set by AHRI that stipulated specific cylinder colors for specific refrigerants. However, as more refrigerants have been created, an increased number of cylinder colors have caused confusion and created safety issues in the field. Charging a system with the wrong refrigerant can cause damage to the equipment and to the user.

What will remain the same, is that AHRI mandates specific PMS colors for each refrigerant to be used on the outer packaging, like labels and cartons. You can find that list of colors here. Thus, the carton and cylinder markings should remain the source of identification of the contents inside.

For more information on these guidelines from AHRI, click here. 

Join DynaCycle and Receive A 5% Rebate on R22 Alternatives

As the hot summer months and the busy cooling season come to a close, it’s important that all this season’s recovered refrigerant is recycled and cleaned up to AHRI-700 purity standards so it can be resold back onto the market. Properly reclaimed refrigerant is exactly the same as virgin refrigerant in purity and specification. Reclaimed refrigerant is also vital in order to continue the lifetime of equipment that uses refrigerants that are no longer manufactured. In addition, beginning January 1, 2020 the import and production of virgin R22 will no longer be legal, however, reclaimed R22 will remain legal for years to come. All of these reasons exemplify why it’s important to join a trustworthy reclamation program and get paid for all your recovered gas!

If you haven’t already looked into DynaCycle, our reclamation program, check out all the details here.

We also have an EXCITING offer for new DynaCycle members! When you join DynaCycle, between now and 12/31/19, you will receive a 5% rebate on an order R22 alternatives! See the full details and restrictions below.

AHRI Asks CARB To Delay GWP Limits On Proposed Refrigerant Regulations

In hopes of reaching their goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions to 40% below 1990 levels by 2030, and to reduce HFC emissions to 40% below 2013 levels by 2030, California’s Air and Resources Board (CARB) has proposed regulations that would cap GWP limits on refrigerants and equipment. Throughout their regulatory process, CARB has requested industry and stakeholder comments regarding different aspects of their plans. Recently, the Air-Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI) submitted an alternative regulatory proposal requesting a longer phase-down on GWP limits and changes to what classifies as “new equipment”.

CARB’s Proposal:

  • 150 GWP cap on refrigerant used in new systems with more than 50 lbs of refrigerant by 1/1/2022
  • A ban on the sale of virgin refrigerants with a GWP above 1500 by 1/1/2022
  • 750 GWP cap for new stationary air-conditioning systems by 1/1/2023

AHRI’s Suggested Changes:

  • 1500 GWP cap on medium-sized commercial refrigeration units with between 50 and 300 lbs of refrigerant in 2021 but delaying the 150 GWP cap until 2024, contingent on the adoption of safety standards in the California State Code
  • AHRI is also recommending that new remote condensing units and those used in new construction, with 50-300 lbs of refrigerant, have a 1500 GWP cap in 2021, and a 300 (as opposed to 150) GWP cap in 2024

AHRI also hoped to clarify the definition of “new equipment” to which these GWP limits apply. Currently, CARB’s definition encompasses new stores and existing stores with equipment modified to handle an expanded cooling load or where equipment is replaced in whole or part so that the cost of the components exceeds 50% of the cost of replacing the entire system. AHRI’s concern is that under this definition a store’s entire system may need to be replaced long before it is due to be retrofitted. In AHRI’s new proposal they suggested that retrofit, maintenance, and replacement of equipment components “cannot be done for all applications given the current equipment limitations and restrictions of safety codes and standards.”

CARB is expected to approve final regulations in May 2020.

 

Source:

http://hydrocarbons21.com/articles/9166/ahri_asks_california_for_more_time_on_gwp_changes

Frequently Asked Questions About Our DynaCycle Cylinder Exchange Program

We recently sat down with our distribution center manager in Clayton, NC to discuss what kind of questions she has been receiving regarding our DynaCycle Cylinder Exchange Program. The following questions are currently the most frequently asked about DynaCycle. We will update this list periodically as the questions change. If you have any questions, that were not covered here, about our DynaCycle Cylinder Exchange program please call or email us at the contact info below.

What cylinders do you accept in the Cylinder Exchange Program? We accept 30lb, 50lb, & 123lb steel cylinders. We also accept our DynaCycle branded composite cylinders.

Do you pay for gas? Yes, we do pay for gas. DynaCycle will issue payments in the form of check or credit, whichever the distributor prefers. To learn about the most recent buyback rates for gas, give us a call: (717) 249-0157

What gases do you accept? We accept all non-flammable HFO, HFC, HCFC, and CFC refrigerants.

How does DynaCycle handle dirty refrigerant, contaminated refrigerant or refrigerant recovered from a burnout?  It is expected that recovery cylinders may contain moisture, air, and oil. This is the reason that the actual net refrigerant contents of a recovery cylinder are usually lower than calculating net weight by subtracting the cylinder’s tare weight from the gross weight of the filled cylinder.

As long as cylinder contents fall within a reasonable range, as indicated below, no disposal charge will be incurred. In the rare case that cylinder contents fall outside this range, a disposal fee will be charged.

Why should we choose DynaCycle over another reclamation program? Unlike many other programs, we are still paying for gas! We also created our program with the help of distributors in the market to ensure that it was the easiest program for them to implement. We know distributors are busy and the last thing they need is unnecessary work. The DynaCycle program is flexible and customized to your business footprint, sends you all the necessary material needed to start the program (see the full list here), supplies EPA compliant reports at no charge, has no shipping costs, requires no obligation to purchase refrigerant or sign up annually, and has no pump-down fees.

Will I get paid for HFC blends such as R410A or R421A? DynaCycle pays $.10/ lb. for 100% pure HFC Blends (such as R421A) that can be identified by a Neutronics refrigerant analyzer. Anything less than 100% purity contains an additional component and is thus considered a mixed gas. It is cost-prohibitive to separate gases with 3 or more components so they must be properly disposed of.

How do we keep our cylinders organized while recovering gas? At DynaCycle we’ve created a cylinder sleeve that leaves you space to fill in your name and what type of refrigerant you are recovering. Use a separate cylinder for each kind of refrigerant. See picture below

 

For more information on the DynaCycle Cylinder Exchange Program please call (717) 249-0157 or email info@dynacycle.com.